Depression Self-Assessment

Do you have any of the following signs or symptoms of depression?

  • Persistent sad, anxious, or "empty" feelings
  • Feelings of hopelessness or pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness, or helplessness
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex
  • Fatigue and decreased energy
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details, and making decisions
  • Insomnia, early-morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping
  • Overeating or appetite loss
  • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts
  • Aches or pains, headaches, cramps, or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment

How can I help yourself if you are depressed?

If you have depression, you may feel exhausted, helpless, and hopeless. It may be extremely difficult to take any action to help yourself. But as you begin to recognize your depression and begin treatment, you will start to feel better.

To help yourself:

  • Do not wait too long to get evaluated or treated. There is research showing the longer one waits, the greater the impairment can be down the road. Please call the FIT/UCE Employee Assistance Program (EAP) at (212) 217-5600 for a confidential appointment. We can assess further what if any help is needed and connect you to the appropriate resource.
  • Try to be active and exercise. Go to a movie, a ballgame, or another event or activity that you once enjoyed.
  • Set realistic goals for yourself.
  • Break up large tasks into small ones, set some priorities and do what you can as you can.
  • Try to spend time with other people and confide in a trusted friend or relative. Try not to isolate yourself, and let others help you.
  • Expect your mood to improve gradually, not immediately. Do not expect to suddenly "snap out of" your depression. Often during treatment for depression, sleep and appetite will begin to improve before your depressed mood lifts.
  • Postpone important decisions, such as getting married or divorced or changing jobs, until you feel better. Discuss decisions with others who know you well and have a more objective view of your situation.
  • Remember that positive thinking will replace negative thoughts as your depression responds to treatment.
  • Continue to educate yourself about depression.

Preceding information taken from the National Institute of Mental Health website. Please check there for additional information or contact the EAP. We uphold the strictest professional and legal limits of confidentiality.

Contact Us

Dubinsky Center, Room 608D
(212) 217-5600

Voicemail is connected 24 hours a day and messages are retrieved daily. 

Office Hours:
Monday, 9 am3 pm
Wednesday, 9 am - 1 pm
Thursday, 9 am–3 pm

All appointments and calls are held in the strictest confidence.