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Upcoming Exhibitions

Model wearing the Mystère coat by Christian Dior in Paris at Malmaison. Photography by Louise Dahl-Wolfe, color proof, featured in Harper’s Bazaar, November 1947. Collection of The Museum at FIT. Photograph by Louise Dahl-Wolfe © 1989 Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents

The Women of Harper’s Bazaar, 1936–1958

Gallery FIT
March 1 – April 2, 2016 

The Women of Harper’s Bazaar, 1936–1958 explores the dynamic collaboration among Harper’s Bazaar editor-in-chief Carmel Snow, fashion editor Diana Vreeland, and photographer Louise Dahl-Wolfe during their time at the magazine. Capturing a transformative period in the magazine’s history, this is the first exhibition to focus on the interaction between these three individuals. Organized by the graduate students in the Fashion and Textile Studies: History, Theory, Museum Practice MA program, the exhibition draws from The Museum at FIT’s extensive collection of Louise Dahl-Wolfe color photographs donated by the photographer herself. The exhibition presents 37 Louise Dahl-Wolfe photographs shown alongside 9 garments by Christian Dior, Charles James, Mainbocher, Claire McCardell, and Carolyn Schnurer. Related materials such as behind-the-scene photographs will further highlight the creative process that made Harper’s Bazaar the definitive fashion magazine of the time.

Read more about the exhibition.

Image: Model wearing the Mystère coat by Christian Dior in Paris at Malmaison, color proof, featured in Harper’s Bazaar, November 1947. Collection of The Museum at FIT. Photograph by Louise Dahl-Wolfe. © 1989 Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents

 


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Proust's Muse

Special Exhibitions Gallery
September 2016 – January 7, 2017 

The Museum at FIT is collaborating with the Palais Galliera (Musée de la Mode de la Ville de Paris) on Proust's Muse, an exhibition focusing on the wardrobe of Élisabeth, Comtesse de Greffulhe, whose beauty and elegance was one of the main inspirations for Marcel Proust's fictional character, the Duchesse de Guermantes from his novel la recherch du temps perdu (In Search of Lost Time).

Marie Anatole Louise Élisabeth de Riquet de Caraman-Chimay, known as Élisabeth, was born on July 11, 1860. She was the eldest daughter of one of the richest men in Belgium and, at the age of eighteen, the young princess married the handsome and wealthy vicomte Henry Greffulhe. She was, however, much closer to her cousin, Robert de Montesquioiu. An Aesthete of highly refined tastes, Montesquiou had a profound influence on Greffulhes style of dress.

The Comtesse and Robert collaborated on many artistic crusades ranging from Wagner to the Ballets Russes. They helped provide a pension to the impoverished poet, Verlaine, frequented sances together, and in 1904 they organized an exhibition of the work of the Symbolist painter Gustave Moreau. She once organized a fancy dress party for charity at Versailles, which may have been the source for the story of Marie Antoinettes ghost.

Image: Comtesse Greffulhe wears a white dress by Worth. Photograph by Nadar, September 5, 1887. 

 

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