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Full Program

Monday, June 6 - artisanship

 
8:30 - 9:15 am Breakfast & Registration 
9:15 - 9:30 am Welcome
9:30 - 10:30 am

African Design and Artisanship

Simone Cipriani, Head and Founder, The Ethical Fashion Initiative


The Ethical Fashion Initiative harnesses the power of fashion as a vehicle out of poverty by connecting artisans in the developing world to fashion’s supply chain. Since its inception, the initiative has evolved to work with emerging African designers to promote their talent at an international level and support Made in Africa production. Working with top fashion houses around the world, and a growing number of African fashion brands, the Ethical Fashion Initiative encourages the building of a more ethical and responsible fashion industry.
10:30 - 10:45 am Coffee Break & Mixer
10:45 am - Noon

Artisan Economy

Peggy Clark, Director, Alliance for Artisan Enterprise

Rebecca van Bergen, Founder and Executive Director, Nest

Matthew Scanlan, CEO, Naadam Cashmere

Moderator: Sass Brown, Acting Associate Dean, School of Art and Design, FIT


The artisan sector is second only to agriculture in terms of employment in the developing world. An estimated $34 billion market, 65 percent of artisan activity takes place in developing economies, yet most artisans work in isolated environments, and lack access to broader markets. Many designers who would love to work with artisans do not know how to make the relevant connections. This diverse panel addresses the value of the artisan economy from the perspective of multiple stakeholders.
Noon - 12:15 pm Coffee Break & Mixer
12:15 - 1:30 pm

American Craftsmanship

Jason Ross, Creative Director, Artemas Quibble 

Terry Buck, Founder, Terry Buck Weave Design

Scott Morrison, Co-founder, 3x1

Moderator: Nomi Kleinman, Assistant Professor and Assistant Chair, Textile/Surface Design, FIT


Artisans offer a counterbalance to fast-paced mass production through handcrafted and locally manufactured products. The panelists work with a variety of materials to create contemporary and traditional American products. By paying homage to traditional techniques and materials these entrepreneurs are helping to preserve and revive American craftsmanship.

1:30 - 2:30 pm Lunch Break
2:30 - 5:30 pm Elective Sessions (choose one)
 

Boro Mindful Repair Workshop

Kenta Watanabe, Co-founder, Buaisou Brooklyn

Sayaka Toyama, Co-founder and Director, Buaisou Brooklyn


This session looks at the history of Boro, mainly from the northern part of Japan, followed by a hands-on mending workshop. Participants will learn the basic techniques of mending and stitching using Buaisou's 100 percent "sukumo" indigo dyed fabrics from Japan. Students may bring their own damaged textiles or garments to work on or practice on fabric scraps provided.
 

Nuno Felting Workshop

Yukako Satone, Founder, Loop of the Loom


A contemporary felting technique named for the Japanese word "nuno," meaning cloth, the process bonds loose wool fibers to silk gauze, creating a lightweight felt. Participants will create a one-of-a-kind scarf.

5:30 - 6:30 pm Social Mixer

Tuesday, June 7 - disruptors

 
9:00 - 10:30 am  

Challenging the System

Tara St. James, Founder and Designer, Study NY

Stefan Siegel, CEO and Founder, Not Just a Label

Dr. James Gifford, Senior Strategic Advisor, Tau Investment Management

William Reinisch, Chair, Entrepreneurship, FIT

Moderator: Jeffrey Silberman, Professor and Chair, Textile Development and Marketing, FIT


As companies both small and large grapple with how they need to change to thrive and grow in today’s evolving world, social development goals serve as a guiding light. Developing new solutions and services can provide a framework that helps companies enter new markets and create entirely new businesses. System disruptors have found new ways to grow and increase competitiveness despite the global challenges they face. They are using sustainable development goals to replace the notion of corporate social responsibility, and are using powerful social opportunity tools. The panel is composed of those making a difference, from small to large, and artisanal to corporate.
10:30 - 10:45 am Coffee Break & Mixer
10:45 - Noon

The Hidden Price Tag

Elizabeth Cline, Author, Overdressed

Maxine Bedat, Co-founder, Zady

Kirsten Brodde, Project Lead, DETOX Campaign, Greenpeace

Moderator: Sass Brown, Acting Associate Dean, School of Art and Design, FIT


The hidden price tag refers to the cost of clothing and apparel production to people and planet, as opposed to the cost paid for an item of clothing at the cash register. The second-largest polluter of any industry in the world, apparel production is also the second-largest user of water. The average lifespan of a piece of clothing is three years, and the average American woman has more than 20 items of clothing sitting unworn in her closet. The panel participants have all tracked the impact of the apparel industry, and formulated their own more ethical response.
Noon - 12:15 pm Coffee Break & Mixer
12:15 pm - 1:15 pm

Cultural Appropriation

Nina Braga, Director, Instituto-E

Ariele Elia, Assistant Curator, Museum at FIT


Cultural appropriation is the use of elements of a culture by non­natives of that culture. This session explores the difference between appropriation that can be negative and even harmful, and positive inspiration from a culture. The global economy has opened the doors for a wider variety of traditional products to be available to consumers, but producers are not always treated fairly in the supply chain. This session will explore issues around cultural use and misuse, native fashion collections, and fair trade for native products.
1:15 - 2:15 pm Lunch Break
2:15 - 5:15 pm   Elective sessions (choose one)
 

Iron and Plant Printing

Susanne Goetz, Assistant Professor, Textile/Surface Design, FIT


Exploring the combination of mordants with plant-based dyes, participants create natural, lasting results in a range of colors. Painting, printing. and experimental dye techniques are introduced and encourage individual creations. Participants will create a one-of-a-kind scarf.
 

Upcycled Wovens

Nomi Dale Kleinman, Assistant Professor and Assistant Chair, Textile/Surface Design, FIT


Designers are reinterpreting and reusing a range of materials to produce products at a higher level. In this hands-on workshop, participants explore a variety of materials to deconstruct and reconstruct into woven samples. T-shirts, plastics, disposable bags, scrap metal, waste yarn and more will be used to develop original designs on hand- weaving looms.

Wednesday, June 8 - Supply chain

 
9 - 10 am  

MISTRA Future Fashion

Rebecca Earley, Professor, Sustainable Textile and Fashion Design, University of the Arts, London

Environmental impacts from industry waste continue to grow at an ever more rapid pace. This accelerated pace has led to new design approaches to meet the need for speed and the cultivated appetite for rapid consumption. How does designing fast products differ from more traditional design approaches? Conversely, the idea of designing long-lasting products has been a part of the industry from the outset, before product obsolescence was dreamt up in the 1950s. How has “slow design” evolved in recent years as a counter-approach? How can we change the way we design in order to deliberately slow down, or speed up, the lifespan of a product? (Note: A Circular Speeds workshop will be held from 2:00-6:00 pm.)

10 - 10:15 am Coffee Break & Mixer 
10:15 - 11:30 am

Transparency

Kavita Parvar, Founder and Creative Director, The IOU Project

Ruth Spencer, Director of Sales and Marketing, Sourcemap

MeiLin Wan, Vice President, Textile Sales, Applied DNA Sciences

Moderator: Suzanne Goetz, Assistant Professor, Textile/Surface Design, FIT


Consumers are starting to demand detailed information about the sources making their products. Issues such as quality, safety, and ethics are important factors in the manufacturing process. Both the maker and the user benefit from transparency in the production process. This panel explores how companies are addressing this issue and finding creative and unexpected solutions to forming a transparent supply chain.

11:30 - 11:45 am Coffee Break and Mixer
11:45 am - 1 pm

Indigo

Sarah Bellos, Founder and CEO, Stony Creek Colors

Rowland Ricketts III, Indigo farmer and dye artist, Ricketts Indigo

Sayaka Toyama, Co-founder and Director, Buaisou Brooklyn

Kenta Watanabe, Founder, Buaisou and Co-founder, Buaisou Brooklyn

Moderator: Jeffrey Silberman, Chair, Textile Development and Marketing, FIT

As companies small and large grapple with how to change their organizations in order to thrive and grow in today’s evolving world, social development goals can serve as a guiding light. Sometimes developing new solutions and services provides a framework that can help companies enter new markets or even create entirely new businesses. System disruptors have found new ways to grow and increase competitiveness despite global challenges. They have already replaced the notion of corporate social responsibility with sustainable development goals, and now have progressed to a more powerful tool, social opportunity. Join a discussion with those who are making a difference, from small to large, from artisanal to corporate.

1 - 2 pm Lunch Break
2 - 5 or 2 - 6 pm Elective sessions (choose one)
 

Indigo Dye Workshop (2 - 5 pm)

Rowland Ricketts III, Indigo farmer and dye artist, Ricketts Indigo

Liz Spencer, Founder, Dogwood Dyer

Ajoy Sarkar, Associate Professor, Textile Development and Marketing, FIT

This hands-on workshop will enable participants to develop an understanding of the world of traditional indigo dyeing and its important role in the spectrum of natural dyes.  On its own, indigo provides a complete range of blues, and when combined with other natural dyes indigo creates the possibility of vibrant greens and rich purples.  Participants will work collectively to create a personal swatch card of the exciting potential of indigo.

 

Circular Speeds Workshop (2 - 6 pm)

Rebecca Earley – Professor, Sustainable Textile and Fashion Design, University of the Arts, London

In this workshop we look at changes in design approach by examining a range of fast and slow textile products that have been commercially successful in the UK, Sweden, and beyond. We look behind the product to the process of design and visualize the changes, collaborations, materials, and production decisions that make these different speeds possible. We also ask what new technologies, systems, and enterprises have emerged to work with closing the loop on both fast and slow products. By the end of the workshop participants will have co-designed one of four garment types, to last two different time frames –  one fast and one slow.

Thursday, June 9 - Materials

 
9 - 10 am

Recycled Materials

Giusy Bettoni, Founder, C.L.A.S.S.

Jennifer Gilbert, CMO, I:Collect USA

Moderator: Nomi Dale Kleinman, Assistant Professor and Assistant Chair, Textile/Surface Design, FIT


Eleven million tons of textiles are put into the waste stream every year and the average American trashes 65 pounds of textiles each year. Capturing this waste and addressing recyclability is a crucial step in conserving our finite raw materials and moving towards a circular economy approach to design. This panel explores pre- and post-consumer recycled textile use, and examines closing the loop on textile waste by capturing products and upcycling or recycling materials.

10 - 10:15 am 

Coffee Break and Mixer
10:15 - 11:30 am

Sustainable Denim

Andrew Olah, CEO, Olah, Inc.

Kara Nicholas, VP, Product Design and Marketing, Cone Denim

Moderator: Jeffrey Silberman, Professor and Chair, Textile Development and Marketing, FIT


The future success of the denim industry is directly related to the industry’s willingness to embrace product development innovations with improved sustainability practices and technologies. This panel addresses the recognition by key change agents in the supply chain that the industry must evolve to incorporate new developments in dyestuffs, fibers, weaving, laundering, and finishing.

11:30-11:45 am Coffee Break and Mixer

11:45 am-1:00 pm

Future Materials

Suzanne Lee, Chief Creative Officer, Modern Meadow, and Founder, Biofabricate

Amanda Parkes, Chief of Technology and Research, Manufacture New York

Daniel Grushkin, Vice President, Co-Founder, and Resident Journalist, Genspace

Moderator: Sass Brown, Acting Associate Dean, School of Art and Design, FIT


Whether explored by established companies or in community-based biotechnology labs, new developments in technology allow for the creation of innovative textiles. Imagine materials grown in the laboratory, or wearable technology incorporated into clothing. Examining the crossover between design and science, this panel will discuss how future materials can change the shape of the textile and fashion industry.

1 - 2 pm   Catered Lunch and Wrap Session
2 - 5 or 2 - 6 pm Elective Sessions (choose one)
 

Circular Speeds Workshop (2 - 6 pm)

Rebecca Earley – Professor, Sustainable Textile and Fashion Design, University of the Arts, London

In this workshop we look at changes in design approach by examining a range of fast and slow textile products that have been commercially successful in the UK, Sweden, and beyond. We look behind the product to the process of design and visualize the changes, collaborations, materials, and production decisions that make these different speeds possible. We also ask what new technologies, systems, and enterprises have emerged to work with closing the loop on both fast and slow products. By the end of the workshop participants will have co-designed one of four garment types, to last two different time frames –  one fast and one slow.

 

Growing Textiles (2 - 5 pm)

Sasha Wright, Assistant Professor, Science and Math, FIT

Theanne Schiros, Assistant Professor, Science and Math, FIT


How do biological organisms grow? Most things break down simple sugars to create energy, then use this energy to assemble the building blocks of new cells. This workshop introduces the basic biology of growing textiles and demonstrates how to prepare a cell culture so participants can grow their own microbial leather at home. Finally, we will demonstrate several methods for post-processing of the material: natural pigment dyeing, shaping, and cutting. Participants will have the opportunity to leave the workshop with microbial leather that they can gro at home, as well as a demo swatch of pre-dried microbial leather that they have dyed themselves.

Friday, June 10 - Optional day - sustainable excursions (Sold out)

 
Join us on Friday to deepen your understanding of what you learned and connect with fellow participants. We start the day reflecting on the Summer Institute experience and then journey around New York City to get a closer look at workplaces at the leading edge of sustainability, artisanship, and textiles.
9 - 10 am

Reflective Breakfast

Hanamazuki

Breakfast with tea, coffee, bagels, and pastry.

Join us for a light breakfast while we debrief and reflect on the past four days. Through a short Mindfulness training we will set the stage for understanding transformational activism. Participants will discuss actionable steps for the future and learn a tool to keep motivated and focused on their core missions.

10:30 - 11:30 am

Studio Visit

Jason Ross – Artemas Quibble

Artemas Quibble has produced high-end accessories for the likes of Donna Karan, Urban Zen, Rick Owens, and Helmut Lang. Every item is handcrafted in Ross’s Red Hook studio, many embellished with silver, brass, and antique objects, making each piece unique. Many of his tools are handmade, each imparting its distinctive character to his materials.

 11:45 - 1 pm

Site Visit

Manufacture NY

Manufacture New York is a fashion design and production incubator for independent designers based in Brooklyn. Manufacture NY enables emerging designers to stay in New York City by mentoring, training, and supplying them with affordable, consistent domestic production resources so that their brands can grow.

1 -2 pm

Lunch

2:30 - 3:30 pm

 

Site Visit

Textile Arts Center

The Textile Arts Center is a NYC-­based resource facility dedicated to raising awareness and understanding of textiles through creative educational programs. TAC provides classes that encourage engagement with traditional crafts and offers consulting and custom design services to the industry.

4:15 - 5:15 pm

 

Site Visit

Scott Morrison3x1

3x1’s space houses a complete jean manufacturing facility and the largest collection of selvedge denim in the world. A team of patternmakers, sewers, and designers creates off-­the­-rack and bespoke jeans right in the store.

5:30 - 8 pm

 

Social

Nudie Jeans

The Swedish brand Nudie Jeans produces a 100 percent organic cotton denim collection that is environmentally and socially responsible and transparent. The social gathering will take place in their brand-new New York retail outlet, which offers free repair service on all Nudie Jeans denim to all customers and resells secondhand products, giving them a second life.

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