/prototype.js/validation.js/effects.js /robots.txt

Course Descriptions

EN 121
English Composition
3 credits
Prerequisite or Co-requisite: college-level English proficiency as demonstrated by placement test or completion of appropriate ES course(s)
This course encourages students' confidence, writing fluency, and the development of a competent writing self by focusing on the writing process. A number of forms are employed, including brainstorming, freewriting, journal writing, reading response journals, and formal essay writing. Classes are conducted as workshops, and both peers and instructor offer constructive feedback. (G1: Basic Communication)

EN 141
Fundamentals of Communication
3 credits
Students examine principles associated with human communication and its contexts. Specific contexts where communication plays a vital role include interpersonal, intercultural, listening, organizational, small group, verbal and nonverbal communication. Theoretical concepts and their practical applications are addressed.

EN 231
Short Fiction
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
Students read and analyze stories by authors from around the world. They consider various aspects of narrative and explore different modes of storytelling. The study of short fiction prepares students to read more widely on their own in the future. (G7: Humanities)

EN 232
Perspectives on American Literature
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
This course gives students an understanding of the American heritage based on three suggested themes: the Puritan ethos, the American dream, and reevaluation of the dream. Includes readings from such major writers as Dickinson, Faulkner, Fitzgerald, Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, and Whitman. (G7: Humanities)

EN 233
Poetry
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
By reading and analyzing a wide range of poems from a variety of time periods and cultures, students are introduced to the literary genre of poetry. Students examine word usage, figures of speech, rhythm and meter, and other poetic devices. Understanding and appreciation of poetry are enhanced by reading criticism and listening to recordings. (G7: Humanities)

EN 234
Gay and Lesbian Literature
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or equivalent, and one English or speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Students read a selection of fiction, poetry, and drama from the mid-19th and 20th centuries and analyze how the texts make use of themes and images such as race, class, gender, sexuality, same-sex desire, homosociality, and the trope of the closet. The construction of, and criteria for, a canon of gay and lesbian literature are considered. Readings are chosen from such authors as Wilde, Whitman, Freud, Hughes, Baldwin, and Rich. (G7: Humanities)

EN 235
African American Literature
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or equivalent, and one English or speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
A survey of the history of African-American literature from slavery to the present is offered. Students read and analyze various genres of African-American literature and are introduced to the social, economic, and political forces that have influenced the writers. Through presentations, critical reading, and analytical writing, students become familiar with the influence of these works on the evolution of world literature. (G7: Humanities)

EN 236
Major Writers of the Western World
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
Studies major themes in the cultural heritage of the Western world from Greek tragedy to the modern novel. Readings are from such representative writers as Plato, Sophocles, Euripides, Dante, Shakespeare, Austen, Flaubert, Tolstoy, Ibsen, Chekhov, Mann, and Sartre. (G7: Humanities)

EN 238
Comedy
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
Studies the nature and characteristics of comedy. Includes an equal consideration of form and meaning. Materials are from such authors as Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Jonson, Moliere, and Congreve, and performers such as Chaplin, the Marx Brothers, and Woody Allen are studied. Includes background readings from such critics as Santayana, Meredith, Frye, Langer, Freud, and Bergson. (G7: Humanities)

EN 241
Professional Speech Communication
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
Communication theory is discussed and applied to various areas such as verbal and nonverbal communication and listening in professional contexts. Among the activities the course focuses on are interviews and presentations. Videotaping is used to facilitate learning and assessment.

EN 242
Public Speaking
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
Covers all major aspects of speech preparation, such as formulating purpose statements, analyzing and adapting to audiences, organizing and outlining ideas, assessing evidence and reasoning, and using language effectively. The study of various areas of speech presentation--such as vocal and nonverbal communication, and use of appropriate visuals--complement preparation. Students give a variety of informative and persuasive presentations, which are videotaped and analyzed by the students and the instructor.

EN 243
Voice and Articulation: Theory and Practice
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or equivalent
Students learn to apply theories of speech perception and production in order to analyze, modify, and control their voices and articulation so they can communicate more effectively. Exercises in listening, voice, and speech are conducted.

EN 244
Speech Dynamics in Group Communication
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
Studies techniques of effective communication in the group process. Students learn to become more skillful communicators through the use of speech dynamics as applied to the psychology of communication. Group members are involved in controversial discussions as participants and group leaders. Emphasis is placed on the enlightenment and problem-solving types of discussion.

EN 245
Intercultural Communication
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
Students are introduced to the communication process among people from different cultures. The course examines how factors such as cultural patterns, verbal and nonverbal communication, and perception play a role in intercultural relationships. Theory and research in intercultural communication are presented and students apply this information to intercultural encounters.

EN 251
Theatre Arts
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
Focuses on appreciation of the theatre through the study of dramatic art as it evolves from page to stage. Students study the relationship of drama text to performance through reading, acting exercises, and theatre attendance. (G6: Arts)

EN 253
Dramatic Literature
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
Surveys dramatic literature and the development of theatrical performance. Focuses on the evolution of the use of theatrical space in the history of theatre. Students read representative plays and documents of Greek, Roman, Medieval, Elizabethan, Restoration, and 19th- and 20th-century drama. (G7: Humanities)

EN 254
Drama: From Script to Live Theatre (Winter Only)
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or equivalent
Offers students an understanding and appreciation of all aspects of the theatre. Provides them--under the instruction of a professional theatre company and on the premises of a theatre--with knowledge of the processes involved in transforming the play from the printed page to the stage. Course format and supervision are under the direction of the professional staff of an active, performing theatre company in consultation with the English and Speech Department. (G6: Arts)

EN 255
History of Film: 1895-1959
3 credits; 2 Lecture and 2 LABORATORY hours per week
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362
This course presents an overview of cinema history from its beginning to 1959 and provides students with the basic tools for analyzing the art of film. Students view representative films from major movements and study the uses of camera, editing, lighting, and sound. (G7: Humanities)

EN 256
History of Film: 1960 to Present
3 credits; 2 Lecture and 2 LABORATORY hours per week
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
This course presents an overview of cinema history since 1959, with attention to the cultural, political, economic, and technological forces that helped to shape cinema during this time. Significant trends within the U.S. are studied, including new and changing genres, independent and maverick filmmakers, and the dominance of Hollywood blockbusters. Students are introduced to national cinemas in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. (G7: Humanities)

EN 257
Major Movements in Chinese, Japanese and Korean Film
3 credits; 2 Lecture and 2 LABORATORY hours per week
Prerequisite: EN 121 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
This course is an introduction to major film directors, movements, and genres from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, and South Korea. Formal and stylistic aspects of films as well as their historical, transnational, and socio-cultural contexts are addressed. Students discuss and write critically about East Asian film. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations)

EN 258
Introduction to Performance Studies
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or equivalent
This course provides an overview of the field of performance studies by studying both its interdisciplinary history and its enactment in different kinds of performance-based activities. By analyzing, attending, and creating performance, students come to understand the way performance constructs spectacle and everyday life.

EN 259
French Cinema
3 credits; 2 Lecture and 2 LABORATORY hours per week
Students are introduced to the rich legacy of French Cinema, from its early days in silent film to Surrealism and Poetic Realism between World War I and World War II to its position of influence with the New Wave in the 1960s. The political cinema of the 1970s is examined, as well as todayís new French filmmakers. (G7: Humanities)

EN 266
Screenwriting I
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362
This course introduces the practice of writing fiction for the screen, focusing on the short film. In a workshop setting, students explore a range of approaches to the short screenplay, from traditional to innovative, and use examples from a variety of genres and geographical origins. (G6: Arts)

EN 271
Literature and History: The Development of American Culture to 1865
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Students read significant texts from America's cultural development against the background of a narrative of U.S. history through the Civil War. The course surveys a wide variety of literature, from firsthand accounts of slavery to philosophical sources of the U.S. Constitution to early documents in the debate over the role of women in society. (G7: Humanities; G10: American History)

EN 272
Identity in America: History and Literature, 1865 to Present
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Students read and interpret literary texts in order to understand the evolution of America's self-images since the Civil War. They explore the cultural context of particular works and how identity manifests itself in literature. Themes examined include regional and ethnic diversity between 1865 and World War I; modernism and expatriation in a context of alienation, loss of faith, and new scientific questions between 1918 and World War II; the civil rights and women's movements through 1980; and multiculturalism, postmodernism, and the implications of technological development and globalization in the last 20 years. (G7: Humanities; G10: American History)

EN 273
Literature of India
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Students examine selected texts from major periods of Indian literature with a focus on the historical context. Throughout the readings, they consider how the interactions of mythical ancient stories, history, culture, and religion are represented. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations)

EN 274
Voices of Civil Rights in American History
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362 or equivalent
An examination of the evolution of civil rights rhetoric in the history of the United States. Students study civil rights speeches and the political, social, and cultural events that surrounded them. Speeches are analyzed using Aristotle's logic, emotion, and ethics. (G10: American History)

EN 275
Literature of the Sixties

3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or equivalent
This course is an introduction to the literature of the cultural and social revolution that took place in the U.S. during the 1960ís and early Ď70ís.  Students read a range of fiction, non-fiction, and poetry, and consider aspects of music, film, fashion, and art, focusing on themes and images that reflect this period.
(G7: Humanities)

EN 281
Chinese Cinema

3 credits, 2 Lecture and 2 LAB hours per week
Prerequisite: EN 121 or equivalent
Students are introduced to major film directors, movements, and genres from China, Taiwan, and Hong Kong. They discuss and write critically about Chinese film, with close attention paid to the formal and stylistic aspects of film, and their historical, transnational, and socio-cultural contexts. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations)

EN 299
Independent Study in English or Speech
Variable Credits (3 Credits Maximum);
Prerequisite: a minimum 3.5 GPA and approval of instructor, chairperson, and dean for Liberal Arts

EN 321
Strategies of Business Communication
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Students analyze business situations to write effective correspondence, job search materials, reports, and presentations. They also learn various strategies to elicit appropriate responses for specific audiences. Students are guided in techniques of business research and documentation and develop strategies for using available technology.

EN 322
Writing in the Art and Design Professions
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Art and Design students analyze a variety of professional situations in order to create competitive marketing materials, persuasive presentations, and reader-appropriate correspondence. They also develop strategies for producing effective proposals and briefs through guided research and descriptive writing practice. Students develop strategies for using available technologies.

EN 323
Specialized Writing and Thesis Preparation
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Art and Design students develop their research, presentation, and writing skills in preparation for their senior thesis projects. They also analyze professional communications, correspondence (electronic messages, memoranda, and letters), promotional materials, basic contracts, and oral reports. Using available technology, students learn to write and speak in a clear, specific, and organized manner.

EN 331
Introduction to Shakespeare
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Selected poetry and plays are presented from a variety of historical, theatrical, and critical perspectives. Students explore Shakespeare's works in relation to the Elizabethan and Jacobean times in which they were produced. They also consider the works' continuing appeal to readers and audiences of theatre and film. (G7: Humanities)

EN 333
Modern Literature: The Spirit of the Twentieth Century
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Emphasizes innovative literary techniques and themes of alienation and social criticism in works by such modern authors as Dostoyevsky, Kafka, T.S. Eliot, Ellison, Sartre, Camus, and Beckett, and by authors from Latin America, Africa, and Asia. (G7: Humanities)

EN 334
The Novel
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Introduces students to the novel as a genre, through the study of selected English, Continental, and American works. Readings are from such representative novelists as Cervantes, Fielding, Austen, Stendhal, Dickens, Dostoyevsky, James, and Hemingway. (G7: Humanities)

EN 335
Working Women in the United States: 1865 to Present
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
A survey of almost 150 years of U.S. history and literature through the lens of working women. Students learn the landmarks of American history, women's struggles, and their contributions. (G7: Humanities; G10: American History)

EN 342
Argumentation and Persuasion
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Examines the strategies and techniques used to influence the decision-making processes. Students prepare and present persuasive speeches based on principles of argumentation and persuasion. Exercises in debate are also included.

EN 361
Creative Writing
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
In a workshop environment, students prepare a portfolio of works from one or more of the following genres: fiction, poetry, or drama. Structure, plot, characterization, point of view, theme, and metaphoric language are explored, and works-in-progress are critiqued by faculty and fellow students. Through the processes of writing, critiquing, and revising, ideas are shaped into imaginative form. (G6: Arts)

EN 362
Creative Nonfiction
3 credits
Prerequisites: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course
In this advanced writing course, students are taught the skills needed to produce informal essays or chapters of nonfiction books of high quality. Drawing upon observation, experience, and research, they create works of intellectual substance that reveal carefully shaped structure. Students develop ease and efficiency in their writing processes and work toward clarity, grace, and individual style. (G1: Basic Communication)

EN 363
Fiction Writing
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 234 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
An advanced writing course that develops students' understanding in imaginative storytelling. Students read short stories and novel excerpts and participate in writing exercises to examine writing process strategies. In a workshop environment, students develop and complete two works of short fiction. (G6: Arts)

EN 364
Poetry Writing
3 credits
Prerequisite: or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Students learn the major elements of writing poetry through a variety of exercises and examples. Works-in-progress are critiqued by fellow students in a rigorous yet supportive environment. Poems are revised and collected in a portfolio at the end of the semester. (G6: Arts)

EN 365
Research Writing
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or EN 362, and EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 254 or EN 253 or equivalent, and one additional English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
This course focuses on developing research proposals and presenting research in a documented format. Students are introduced to qualitative research topics, learn to conduct interviews, maintain an ethical regard for their subjects, and engage in fieldwork. Students make revisions in a workshop setting and engage in peer reviews.

EN 366
Screenwriting II
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 266 or approval of instructor
This course focuses on elements of screenwriting for feature-length films, including story concept, three-act structure, the world of the story, protagonist and antagonist, conflict, characterization, scene development, and dialogue. Students formulate individual projects, from pitching a story to presenting a synopsis, preparing an outline, and writing a screenplay. The business end of screenwriting is discussed and students meet film industry professionals. (G6: Arts)

EN 371
Chinese Odyssey: Introduction to Chinese Literature
3 credits
Prerequisite: EN 121 or equivalent, and one English or Speech selective course (EN 231 or EN 232 or EN 233 or EN 236 or EN 241 or EN 242 or EN 244 or EN 245 or EN 253)
Students study Chinese literature by reading and examining a variety of literary forms from a range of historical periods. The course focuses on relationships between the self, the nation, gender roles, and modernity and how the influence of local and global histories have shaped the focus and reception of each work. All readings are in English. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations)

EN 372
Rhetoric in Popular Culture

3 credits
This course examines popular culture as a form of communication, and the tools used to analyze it. Using theories of rhetoric, communication, and social criticism, students unravel popular cultural artifacts and examine how dominant societal discourses, cultural myths, individual identities, and institutional ideologies are reified and subverted.

EN 381
Asian Fiction: Regional Selections (Honors)
3 credits
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
An introduction to East Asian fiction. This course focuses on literature from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Japan, and Korea from a transnational perspective. Through a range of contemporary to classical canonical fiction, students will investigate various literary genres and explore critical concepts of literary and cultural identity studies. All readings are in English. (G7: Humanities; G9: Other World Civilizations)

EN 391
The Creative Imagination: Theory and Process (Honors)
3 credits
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
Theories of the creative process and the nature of creativity are explored. Through readings, journal entries, and case studies of writers, painters, and other artists, students discover practices useful in producing creative works. Particular attention is paid to the creative work of artists traditionally marginalized by gender, race, ethnicity, or socioeconomic class. (G6: Arts; G7: Humanities)

EN 392
Greek Myths and Their Transformations (Honors)
3 credits
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
Introduces Greek deities and Greek myths through readings from original materials (in English translation) as well as interpretations by such authors as Racine, O'Neill, T.S. Eliot, and Sartre. Discusses and analyzes the transformation of myths in film, music, and dance. (G5: Western Civilization; G7: Humanities)

EN 393
Shakespeare (Honors)
3 credits
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
Familiarizes students with the theatre of Shakespeare through language, character, and plot analysis. Discusses themes of deception, betrayal, and power and emphasizes new interpretations of Shakespeare's plays through readings and videotaped performances. (G7: Humanities)

EN 394
American Lives (Honors)
3 credits
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
This literature seminar presents the opportunity to explore the autobiographical impulse in American writing, past and present, through full-scale biographies, works of fiction, drama, and poetry, and in the memoirs so popular today. Students write an autobiographical essay on an aspect of their lives. (G7: Humanities)

EN 395
Travel Literature and the Travel Essay (Honors)
3 credits
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
Students focus on the impact of travel literature and voyagers' chronicles on political, economic, and cultural development in the Eastern and Western worlds, from pre-Renaissance times to the present. They analyze literature of the so-called golden age of travel, the late 18th century, up to the period between the two world wars and contemporary travel literature in order to discern changes brought about by the advent of tour groups, mass travel, and air transport. (G7: Humanities)

EN 396
Shakespeare's Plays (Honors)
3 credits
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
Shakespeare's plays as living literature are introduced. Readings include histories, tragedies, and a late romance, examined in the context of Elizabethan culture and concepts of Shakespearean art from his age to ours. (G7: Humanities)

EN 397
Women in U.S. Theatre (Honors)
3 credits
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
This course explores the art forms and skills that contribute to the collaborative process of theater--the script; directing; costume, set, and lighting design; and theater management--by focusing on American women practitioners. Historical developments, such as feminism and the growth of regional theater, are also examined. (G6: Arts)

EN 398
Film Art/Film Critic (Honors)
3 credits; 2 Lecture and 2 STUDIO hours per week
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
Students are introduced to cinema history and the basic tools for writing about the art of film. They study how meaning in narrative film is elaborated by uses of camera, editing, lighting, sound, and acting. The course emphasizes the contrast between studio and non-studio films, especially those of Europe, Asia, and third-world countries in contrast to products of the powerful Hollywood system. (G6: Arts)

EN 399
The Craft of Writing Poetry (Honors)
3 credits
Prerequisite: qualification for Presidential Scholars Program, or 3.5 GPA with approval of dean for Liberal Arts
Students immerse themselves in writing poems while they examine the technical and historical aspects of poetry. They study basic elements of poetry such as image, figurative language, rhythm, diction, and form to develop the potential of those elements in their own writing. In order to understand their own creative processes, students read essays about craft and process. (G6: Arts)

EN 499
Independent Study in English or Speech
Variable Credits (3 Credits Maximum);
Prerequisite: a minimum 3.5 GPA and approval of instructor, chairperson, and dean for Liberal Arts

FIT LibraryThe Museum at FIT
See More of FITMy FITContact UsGive to FITTake a CourseApplyVisit FIT Adult Learners & Career ProfessionalsEmployers & IndustryAlumni: The Power of ConnectionFaculty & StaffCurrent StudentsParentsRecently Accepted Students FIT & NYCNews & EventsAthletics & RecreationCampus LifeAdmissionsAcademicsAbout FIT
MyFIT Home