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Fall 2013 - Spring 2014 New or Revised Courses

School of Art and Design

New Courses
JD 139 Jewelry Design & Ideations I
, 2.5 cr., 5 lab/studio hrs.
This course is an introduction to jewelry design concepts and ideation, using analog and computer-aided design. Basic design principles, drawing skills and mechanical drafting are covered.
Prerequisite(s): none, Co-requisite(s): JD 174 Studio Fabrication I or approval of chairperson, CIP code: 50.0705

JD 174 Studio Fabrication I, 2.5 cr., 5 lab/studio hrs.
This course introduces students to the foundation techniques of manufacturing jewelry while addressing safety issues in the studio. Processes covered include, but are not limited to, soldering with the oxygen/gas torch and the use of hand and small machine tools to create jewelry in metal and carving wax models to be cast.
Prerequisite(s): none, Co-requisite(s): JD 139 Jewelry Design & Ideations I or approval of chair, CIP code: 50.0703

JD 142 Gemology and Gem Identification, 3 cr., 1 lec., 4 lab/studio hrs.
This course introduces students to gemology and gem identification, with an emphasis on their use in commercial production and price structure. The uses of various gem testing equipment is covered. Students gain basic knowledge of the commonly used gem materials and the ways in which they are used in jewelry.
Prerequisite(s): none, Co-requisite(s): none, CIP code: 50.0713

JD 272 Studio Fabrication II, 2.5 cr., 5 lab/studio hrs.
Students learn to manipulate metal, using techniques ancient and modern, to create precision models for serial production, coupled with an in-depth study of hollow form construction and finishing. Emphasis is placed on professional working techniques and manufacturing practices.
Prerequisite(s): JD 174 Studio Fabrication I or approval of chair, Co-requisite(s): JD 139 Jewelry Design & Ideations II or approval of chair, CIP code: 50.0703

JD 238 Jewelry Design & Ideations II, 2.5 hrs., 5 lab/studio hrs.
This course explores the design and development of sophisticated jewelry pieces. Professional drafting and rendering techniques are practiced using traditional and digital media. Students use their Gemology knowledge to lend veracity to their use and depiction of gem materials. Objects de vertu are explored as a design challenge found in luxury niche markets.
Prerequisite(s): JD 174 Jewelry Design & Ideations I or approval of chair, Co-requisite(s): JD 272 Studio Fabrication II or approval of chair, CIP code: 50.0705

JD 161 Changes, Trends and Appraisals, 2 cr., 1 lec. 2 lab/studio hrs.
Students study the symbolic meaning and economic rationale for jewelry in society, and are introduced to the science of appraising jewelry. They learn stylistic differences, and the causes and factors behind them, and how styles are influenced by social and political events.
Prerequisite(s): none, Co-requisite(s): none, CIP code: 50.0703

JD 273 Studio Fabrication III, 2.5 cr., 5 lab/studio hrs.
This course extends the concept of designing and fabricating jewelry for production. Stone setting and the engineering of static and articulated systems for fine jewelry is covered. Alloying metal and patination are explored and used as invaluable aesthetic enhancements for fine jewelry.
Prerequisite(s): JD 272 Studio Fabrication II or approval of chair, Co-requisite(s): JD 237 3-D Digital Object Design or approval of chair, CIP code: 50.0703

JD 237 3-D Digital Object Design, 2 cr., 1 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.
This advanced digital course focuses on the creation of 3-D models for the jewelry industry. Students develop control over digital commands through modeling basic forms. By combining modeling strategy and problem solving, they create and re-work solid objects, resulting in sophisticated jewelry models, ready for output to digital production hardware.
Prerequisite(s): none, Co-requisite(s): JD 273 Studio Fabrication III, and JD 271 Alternative/Sustainable Materials, CIP code: 50.0705

JD 271 Alternative/Sustainable Materials, 2.5 cr., 5 lab/studio hrs.
This course explores alternative materials for jewelry and small object design. Various natural and synthetic materials are covered such as, but not limited to, plastics and resin, wood, cement, glass, aluminum, and steel. Sustainable sourcing and working methods are stressed and emphasis is placed on professional working techniques and manufacturing practices.
Prerequisite(s): JD 272 Studio Fabrication II or approval of chair, Co-requisite(s): JD 237 3-D Digital Object Design or approval of chair, CIP code: 50.0703

JD 274 Fabrication Capstone/Portfolio, 2.5 cr., 5 lab/studio hrs.
This capstone course explores components and processes necessary for finishing jewelry, from mechanical systems to finishing techniques, culminating in the fabrication of a suite of jewelry demonstrating skills and concepts studied in the program. Production of the suite is integral to concurrent fourth semester design and project management courses.
Prerequisite(s): JD 273 Studio Fabrication III or approval of chair, and JD 271 Alternative/Sustainable Materials, Co-requisite(s): JD 239 Design Capstone/Portfolio and JD 267 Jewelry Seminar/Best Business Practices, CIP code: 50.0703

JD 239 Design Capstone/Portfolio, 2.5 lec., 5 lab/studio hrs.
Students create three collections, designed with a common, related theme, in Fine Jewelry, Fashion Jewelry, and Alternative Materials Jewelry. They create two presentations; a portfolio to display the collections of paper, and a display showing actual samples produced during the class.
Prerequisite(s): JD 237 3-D Digital Object Design, and JD 271 Alternative/Sustainable Materials, Co-requisite(s): JD 274 Fabrication Capstone/Portfolio, and JD 267 Jewelry Seminar/Best Business Practices, CIP code: 50.0703

JD 267 Jewelry Seminar/Best Business Practices, 2.5 cr., 1 lec., 3 lab/studio hrs.
Using current industry price standards, student estimate the cost of their own designs made of precious, semi-precious, or non-precious materials and stones.
Prerequisite(s): all 3rd semester Jewelry Design courses, Co-requisite(s): JD 239 Design Capstone/Portfolio, and JD 274 Fabrication Capstone/Portfolio, CIP code: 50.0703

Revised Courses
FF 243-OLX, Digital Flats and Specs, 1.5 cr., 3 lab/studio hrs.

School of Business and Technology

New Courses
TT 343 Textile Coloration: Principles and Processes, 3 cr., 2 lec./2 lab/studio hrs.
This course emphasizes methods for preparation of fabrics prior to coloration, coloration auxiliaries, dye classification and sourcing, coloration theory, coloration of natural and manufactured textiles, modern coloration processes and equipment, color formulation, measurement and matching, and sustainable textile coloration. The laboratory portion of this course reinforces concepts discussed in lectures.
Prerequisite(s): TS111 or TS 132 or T015/115 or TS122 or approval of chair, CIP code: 19.0904

FM 228 The Business of Fashion Styling, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.
In this course, students explore the role of a fashion stylist as it applies to the field of merchandising. They learn about career opportunities in fashion styling and wardrobe consulting. The business requirements and entrepreneurial opportunities in the field of fashion styling are explored.
Prerequisites(s): none; CIP code: 52.1902

Revised Courses:
IN 424-OLX Export Promotion Marketing, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs

TS 132-OLX Introduction to Textiles for Fashion Designers, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs

School of Graduate Studies

New Courses
FT 634 Advanced Curatorial: Historic Interiors, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs
In this course, students broaden their understanding of the key European and American decorative arts from the seventeenth through to the early twentieth century. They study decorative art objects and textiles found in American public collections. Material culture, geography, and trade are addressed. Professional museum interpretation and care of objects within historic interiors is covered.
Prerequisite(s): none, Co-requisite(s): none, CIP code: 50.0703

Revised Courses
CF 670-BLX Graduate Seminar: Advanced Topics in Leadership (blended learning course), 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.

SE 563-OLX Chemistry for Interior Environments, 1.5 cr., 3 lec. hrs

School of Liberal Arts

New Courses
EN 324 Writing on the Arts, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.,
Students learn to think and write critically about the primarily non-verbal arts, such as sculpture, painting, architecture and dance. Students learn to place a given art form in a cultural context that interacts meaningfully with their own analysis and insight. Renowned and ground-breaking critics serve as models for student’s work.
Prerequisite(s): EN 121 or equivalent; CIP code: 23.0101

FI 271 Fans and Fandom in the Internet Age, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.
This course examines fans and fandom within the context of the history and evolution of mass media and participatory culture. Students explore fan communities as subcultures with their own social structures and cultural practices and engage their origins in cults, celebrity culture, and technological change and innovation.
Prerequisite(s): EN 121; CIP code: 50.0601

HA 241 History of Photojournalism, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.
This course surveys the history of photojournalism as a modern mode of visual communication, and the global political and social history it represents. Students further develop their visual literacy, knowledge of modern history, and understanding of the functions of mass and social media.
Prerequisite(s): none; CIP code: 50.0703

HA 316 The Bauhaus, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.
This course is a study of the history and development of the influential German art, design and architecture school; the artists and architects who served on its faculty; and the body of work produced there from 1919 to 1933, and in Chicago from 1938 to 1949.
Prerequisite(s): HA 112; CIP code: 50.0703
Approved for Gen Ed category Humanities (G7)

IT 345 Italian Food for Thought: Gastronomy in Italian Literature and Culture, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.
From the excesses of the Roman table to today’s ‘Slow food movement’ it is through food that Italians have affirmed and defended their cultural heritage. This course traces the historical evolution of Italian cuisine and maps an overview of Italian literature and culture through an analysis of influential literary texts. Taught in English.
Prerequisite(s): EN 121; CIP code: 05.0126
Approved for Gen Ed category Humanities (G7)

LA 226 American Business from Slavery to the Present, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs
A defining experience of the last millennium, and possibly the next, is the rise of big business in the U.S. Students learn a general history of entrepreneurship in America and a series of case studies about government regulation, labor relations, and other topics.
Prerequisite(s): None; CIP code: 54.0102
Approved for Gen Ed category American History (G10)

LA 227 Pasts in the Present: Modern Chinese History since 1800, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs
This course introduces students to modern Chinese history as well as ways through which one can examine and understand the historical roots of current affairs in and related to China. Two major themes are: changes and continuity in modern China, and China in the world.
Prerequisite(s): None; CIP code: 54.0106
Approved for Gen Ed category Other World Civilizations (G9)

LA 399 Big Ideas in History: Smith, Darwin, Marx, Freud (Honors), 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs
Students learn Western history through the lens of the Big Four of modern thought – Adam Smith, Charles Darwin, Karl Marx, and Sigmund Freud. They use their ideas to grapple with European and American history from the Age of Empire to the birth of modern business, politics, and people.
Prerequisite(s): Qualification for Presidential Scholars Program or 3.5 GPA with approval of Dean for Liberal Arts; CIP code: 54.0101
Approved for Gen Ed categories Western Civilization (G5) and Humanities (G7)

SS 379 Sociology of the Digital Era, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.
This course explores the impact of digital information and communication technologies (ICT’s) in everyday life. Students examine how digital ICT’s have transformed social relations, social structures, identity formation processes, and cultural, political, and economic practices.
Prerequisite(s): none; CIP code: 45.1101

SS 386 Youth Subculture, Identity, and Fashion: A Sociological Perspective, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.
This course explores youth subcultures, in relation to gender, race and class identity. Students are introduced to various case studies of youth subcultures around the world, including Goth, Punk, and Lolita, and analyze how their values, norms, attitudes and beliefs are reflected stylistically.
Prerequisite(s): none; CIP code: 45.1101

FI 334 Film Genres: Films of the Supernatural, 3 cr., 2 lab/2 studio hrs
This course examines films that involve the supernatural, frequently a subgenre of the horror film. Students explore story conventions, iconography, and the relationship to cultural and literary foundations from which these films derive.
Prerequisite(s): none, Co-requisite(s): none, CIP code: 50.0601

HA 462 Art and Ethics, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs
This course focuses on how and why any work of art can become a site of ethical questioning, within the context of many historical and thematic approaches. Students read, discuss, and analyze case studies involving art and ethics, and present their own research.
Prerequisite(s): two HA courses, Co-requisite(s): none, CIP code: 50.0703

Revised Courses
SS 237-OLX Industrial Psychology, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs

SS 378-OLX Asian Popular Culture, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs

HA 361 History and Meaning of the Museum (formerly VA 321), 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.

HA 362 Museum Professions and Administration (formerly VA 431), 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.

HA 461 Senior Seminar: The Museum Exhibition (formerly VA 491), 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.

New-prefixed Film and Media Courses (re-numbered from LA to FI)

FI 111 Introduction to Film, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 221 History of Film, beginnings to 1959, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 222 History of Film, 1960-present, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 231 Documentary Film, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 256 Screenwriting I, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.

FI 261 Introduction to Sound (pending), 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 272 Introduction to Television Studies, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.

FI 273 The Other Hollywood: Film in New York, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 321 Film Theory and Criticism, An Introduction, 3 cr., 3 lec. hrs.

FI 322 Major Directors: Alfred Hitchcock, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 331 Film Genres: Crime Stories, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 332 The Science Fiction Film, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 333 Film Genres: Animation, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 334 Film Genres: Films of the Supernatural, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 341 French Cinema, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 342 Contemporary Korean Cinema, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 356 Screenwriting II, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 361 Advanced Cinematography Workshop, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 362 Advanced Editing Workshop, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 371 Film Art, Film Critic, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 461 Production I, 3 cr., 2 lec., 2 lab/studio hrs.

FI 462 Production II, 3.5 cr., 2 lec., 3 lab/studio hrs.

Program Revisions

  1. Jewelry Design (implementation date, Fall 2015)
  2. Art History and Museum Professions BS Curriculum Changes (implementation date Fall 2014)

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